Army’s Plan for First Shipment of Sig P320 Handguns

We’ve covered the United States Army’s adoption of a new handgun, as it is the first time since 1985 that the Army has selected a new sidearm for the enlisted troops. Think about that for a second: The M9 (the military-grade Beretta 92) replaced the M1911 in 1985, and the M1911 held that spot since well, 1911.* In the past 100 years, the US Army has only had two service pistols. The Army chose the M9 3 years before the introduction of the Glock 17, and firearm technology has changed quite a bit in the past 32 years. Though Glock and other manufacturers felt they were cheated out of the contract, Sig Sauer took home the big prize and the P320 was deemed the M17.

Now, the Army has announced where the first shipment of Sig Sauer P320 will be heading. The first unit to receive the new sidearm this fall is the 101st Airborne. The Army News Service released this statement regarding the new shipment:

Soldiers have many reasons to be excited about the new Sig Sauer modular handguns, which the Army will begin fielding in November, said Lt. Col. Steven Power, product manager of Soldier Weapons.

A soldier assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division fires an M9 pistol during the three-gun shoot competition Nov. 14, 2016 at Fort Stewart. The Army's new modular handgun, the XM17 and XM18 will be fielded by the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, in November. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Lt. Col. Brian Fickel)

A soldier assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division fires an M9 pistol during the three-gun shoot competition Nov. 14, 2016 at Fort Stewart. The Army’s new modular handgun, the XM17 and XM18 will be fielded by the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, in November. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Lt. Col. Brian Fickel)

Testing of the modular handgun system, or MHS, this spring by Soldiers at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, resulted in overwhelmingly positive feedback, Power said, and 100-percent concurrence that the XM17 was an upgrade over the M9.

“That’s an uncommonly positive thing,” Power said, explaining that there’s typically some reluctance with any new system. “Typically even in our own households, when you’re buying a new car, there’s things that people like about the old car better than the new one,” he said.

In this case, all of the Soldiers who tested the handgun said the MHS was more comfortable to shoot and they had better confidence with it, Power said.

The first new XM17 handguns are scheduled to be fielded to the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, in November.

The Army’s versions of the Sig Sauer P320, the XM17 and XM18, have different ammunition requirements than the commercial 320 pistol, and are painted a different color. The P320 was released for commercial use three years ago.

Improved durability and adjustability over the M9, along with interchangeable grips that fit comfortably, are among the features Soldiers can look forward to with the new pistol, Power said.

The Army's new modular handgun, the XM17 and XM18, will be fielded by the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, in November. (Photo Credit: Courtesy photo by Sig Sauer)

The Army’s new modular handgun, the XM17 and XM18, will be fielded by the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, in November. (Photo Credit: Courtesy photo by Sig Sauer)


The new handguns also have an external safety and self-illluminating sights for low-light conditions.

“A big reason why the modular handgun system is such a leap ahead in ergonomics is because of the modular hand grips, instead of just making a one size fits all,” Power said. “The shooter will have a handgrip that fits their hand properly which does a lot to improve accuracy — not only on the first shot but also on subsequent shots.”

Members of the 101st Airborne are scheduled to receive about 2,000 pistols in November. Eventually, the Army will distribute the weapons to all units over a 10-year period. From November 2017 until September 2018, the new handguns will be fielded at a different post each month, except for March and April of 2018, according to the current plan.

Power said troops from different military branches have already trained with the new handguns and tested them, but none have fielded the weapons yet. The new weapons have long been anticipated, as the M9 Beretta, first issued in 1986, is nearing the end of its serviceability.

“That’s pretty dated technology,” Power said of the M9. “The specific performance improvements from MHS over the M9 are in the area of accuracy, dispersion (and) ergonomics. And ergonomics isn’t just about the comfort of the shooter.”

U.S. Army Sgt. Luis Cruz fires a M9 pistol during the 2017 Army Materiel Command's Best Warrior Competition July 18, 2017, at Camp Atterbury, Indiana. The Army's new modular handgun, the XM17 and XM18 will be fielded by the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, in November. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by SFC Teddy Wade)

U.S. Army Sgt. Luis Cruz fires a M9 pistol during the 2017 Army Materiel Command’s Best Warrior Competition July 18, 2017, at Camp Atterbury, Indiana. The Army’s new modular handgun, the XM17 and XM18 will be fielded by the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, in November. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by SFC Teddy Wade)


A lot of the weapon’s accuracy can be attributed to ergonomics, Power said, adding that human factors engineering determines how well the weapon works in a shooter’s hand.

Sig Sauer earned the $580 million contract to produce the weapons in January after winning the Army and Air Force’s XM17 Modular Handgun Competition. The Army will continue to use 9mm rounds, subcontracted to ammunition manufacturer Winchester. Power said the Army did not have a preference to remain with the 9mm rounds, but rather used a systems approach to determine ammunition type.

“There was no prejudice toward 9mm,” Power said. “The goal was to pick a system that best met our requirements.”

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Other branches of the American armed forces have also stated that they will be adopting the M17 as their sidearm.

73 Comments On This Article

  1. My P320 doesn’t have a safety. And frankly I don’t like the fact that it blows up .357 Sig rounds and destroys the frame. The full sized one has issues as far as I’m concerned.

    • Robert Hartwig Jr.

      Sorry but a safety does not always make a weapon better for combat. Training on how to use a weapon does. As a revolver lover the double/single action makes sense to me.

    • The XM17 and XM18 do have external safety, call it the P320A1 if it makes you feel better. Secondly, the Army isn’t using .357SIG, 9mm as noted in the article, basically staying with 9mm was a logistical, aka Systems based requirement in the RFP. With maybe a splash of continued NATO interoperability.

      While I would like to take you’re word for it, and Ill be doing my own reading on that issue for certain, but could you please point us towards the data behind you’re assertion regarding the destruction of the .357SIG mayhem and disasters? Inquiring minds want to know.

  2. Philip Van Cleave

    The safety is optional. I have 5 of them: 4 in .40 S&W and 1 in 9mm and they all run like tops. Fantastic trigger, too. The P320 is my carry gun and they get lots of rounds put through them.

  3. I have no experence with the Sig 9mm and of course not the M17. All I want to know is, is it made in America with American parts by American workers. And are my tax dollars staying in the USA. If not then why is our military using it. Are we Americans unable to build a competitive gun gor or military. Buy American at least with our tax dollars.

    • U.S. Headquarters
      SIG SAUER, Inc.
      72 Pease Boulevard
      Newington, NH 03801 USA

      Just as the contract required: the P320 is made in America and Sig has lots of American workers (and will probably hire lots more).

      And more importantly, our men & women in uniform are getting the handgun they need and can depend on. That’s the real bottom line.

    • I have had my Sig P320 Compact for almost a year now and have fired almost 1000 rounds through it with all types of ammo with no problems and the accuracy is better than me. I have owned over 20 pistols in my lifetime and this is one that I will keep! Changed to grip from medium to small and it fits me perfectly. I could go on and on about the positives here but it would take forever. The Army picked the right firearm, by the way I was in the Army during Viet Nam era. Buy American.

      • Liberty's Advocate

        I have carried my Sig P320 .40 S&W Compact as my EDC for almost 3 years. I was concerned at first due to the shorter barrel length than my Springfield XD – M, that I might be sacrificing some accuracy. Not so! The accuracy was actually improved over the 4.5 in. XD-M and seems less finicky about the kind of ammo I use. I have tested most and for personal reasons have settled on DRT frangible.

    • The Beretta M-9 was MADE in USA, and so is the SIG M-17 pistol. In fact, almost all SIG pistols sold in the USA, are made in their New Hampshire facility.

    • All the pistols made for the U.S. Army by Sig Sauer under its newly minted $580 million contract will be made in New Hampshire. They are hiring 50+ new employees to meet the demand.

    • Dale, absolutely agree, and yes there were a few US brands in there too.

      Personally I am disappointed by the M&P’s poor showing, though if I recall they failed in the early rounds of selection, for something administrative.

      Honestly, out of the 12-14 submissions to the selection program there really were at least 9 that would still be an excellent weapon for military use.

      I’m glad to see what amounts to rapid deployment service wide, wonder how quickly the other services will field them…hmmm how quickly can SIG ramp production and QC to sustainable true mass production levels?

    • You can thank the unions forcing the companies to increase the prices that won’t make the contracts for that… it’s a damn shame, but I agree with you

  4. I have a friend who works for Sig Sauer in New Hampshire and he just informed me that have purchased twenty 5-axis CNC machines. The price per machine is 1 million dollars so they are ready to deliver goodies to the pentagon! Sig Sauer is officially part of the military industrial complex.

    • The civilian version has been available for about two years. The actual military version probably won’t be available to civilians for quite a while. If you want to get 99% there, you can pick up a Sig P320 here: https://goo.gl/B3M7cB or at your LGS.

  5. The fact that the greatest firearms manufacturing country in the world can’t produce a world class pistol for our military shows that something is wrong.

  6. Made in New Hampshire by Americans with American parts. Sig Sauer Inc. is an American company run by an American, and organizationally separate from the holding company, which is run by two German citizens. Sig Sauer went from 130 employees to 1,000 in the past 15 years, after it started making black rifles. They built a big facility in NH recently. They gave the Army what it asked for, and some of the other firms coasted on success or winked at the Army’s stated requirements. So it seems.

    • Other than the fact that more Us Soldiers were accidently shot with the m1911 than enemy soldiers?
      Oh and the fact that you need to hand fit three parts for each pistol?

      Yep nothing was ever wrong the 1911.

    • Robert Hartwig Jr.

      Sorry but the average soldier has never been able to be accurate with the 1911. Woman soldiers by in large have problems with hand size and the bulk of the 1911 as well as the current M9. I will not go into the agruement that women should not be in combat rolls as it is a fact of current life. I agree that the 1911 in the right hands and properly tuned is a great weapon and the 45 acp very effective.The Sig 228 I have has been more accurate then any other gun I own. The next closest to it is my Smith ans Wesson MP9. I credit my success in better accuracy to the fact that these guns FIT MY HAND and are Comfotable.THEY shoot better then me. In todays military it has been proven that guns that fit the indevidual soldier work better then trying to force the soldier to fit the weapon.The 1911 will remain as a backup for the forseeable future but it’s days are numbered as warfare evolves for better or worse,

    • I can’t say that I agree; the 1911 is an AD waiting to happen. There was a reason why commands didn’t allow watch standers to carry a loaded chamber, or no magazine in the pistol, or worse yet not even issue ammo to watch standers. As a Firearms Instructor for 20yrs. in the Coast Guard and another 20+yrs. in Law Enforcement, I’ve seen more ADs with 1911s than with all other pistols & rifles combined. The 1911 is a great pistol, for what it was design, as a battle field pistol, a true war horse. But,…. Current missions and uses of their pistols have changed for all the services to the point where the 1911 simply doesn’t fit the bill. And please spare us the “it’s the fault of limited training” argument. Training time & money isn’t going to support improvement to the level needed to be really proficient with the 1911.

      • Can you explain why you think ADs, as you call them, are the fault of the pistol? How has modern design made the probability of AD less likely? As a Marine I carried the 1911 loaded at all times and the only AD I witnessed was not due to the pistol but the operator.

      • ” the 1911 is an AD waiting to happen” Really? More than all guns combined? What about your tupperware guns? Idiot proof something and we make better idiots!
        News flash, press the trigger the gun goes bang, FOLLOW 3 simple rules and you will get along fine with your firearm. It don’t take much time and training to instill that fact.
        As far as Command not allowing a loaded piece it’s because it was a F’n pacifier nothing more, and the mope that got stuck as watch stander was most likely a screw-up so why would you trust him with an operational weapon?
        Some instructor if you’ve seen that many AD’s. What other pistols were available at that time?
        I’ve seen 3 ahole’s ventilate themselves with the austrian perfection,
        How many Police department’s have seen exponential increases in ND’s and that IS what it is, since adopting the fantastic plastics. Your hyperbole amazes me. The 1911 is over 100 years old and EVERY major manufacture makes a version, That’s PERFECTION!
        Carry and train what you want but don’t let ignorance and bias mascaraed as fact.

  7. My Ruger American ProDuty .45 is a modular chassis firearm that comes with 2-3 different grips types. It’s +P performance reliability is without question and is available in 9mm. This should have been a “no brainer” and it’s all made and manufactured in America hence the name. I’m going to pick up the 9mm in the compact patriot brown version as well!!! Thanks Ruger for making rugged,reliable firearms!!!🇺🇸

  8. My carry weapon is a P320C in 45ACP inserted in a snap lock holster. I don’t need and really don’t want a safety. If I pull my weapon, I want it ready to shoot. I also have the P320C in 9mm, but, while it holds more rounds, I need fewer rounds with the 45ACP. Never had a failure with either weapon. My other carry weapons are the P226 in 40 and the P227 in 45ACP. Had a pin problem with my P226 right off the top. Sig repaired the weapon and gave me an extra magazine. No problems since. That being said, I love the feel of my M1911. It just fits. On the other side, I bought a Glock 22. After putting a couple hundred rounds through it, I traded it for a Smith 44Mag with an 81/2 inch barrel. I literally hated the Glock.

  9. From some reading, they chose the 9 MM for it’s greater round capacity in the gun and in the number of back up clips. The overall weight is signifigantly reduced. It’s proven to have more accurate follow up shots by the user than the .45 ACP. With all the new ammo technology in the 9MM round, it’s definetely up to the task. There’s been considerable improvements in the 9 MM guns and rounds in just the past ~10 years.. Some don’t like them. It’s a choice though too. I use Underwood ammo in my 9 MM concealed carry gun. It produces ~500 ft lbs of energy, at 1,400 FPS. Performance numbers that rival those of a .45 ACP. They’re heavy, hold less than half the rounds of the 9 MM, and the .45 ACP bullets FPS / velocity is slow in comparison, close to half. BTW, the reference to a “1911” no longer refers only to the .45 ACP. They make 9MM, 40 S&W, etc., in “1911” models now too. The 9 MM’s performance levels are nothing like they were 15-20 years ago. And, like I said, it’s a personal choice for what to carry.

  10. The 25th Infantry Division should be getting the new M17 Pistols at the same time as the 101st, especially the Wolf Hounds & 3/4 Cavalry of the 25th Division.

  11. If you put every side arm made on a table in a room, and tell me I will have to defend my life from the next person in the door, I’m picking up the M1911 .45 Cal. No question, No doubt. If that is not an option then a .40 S&W. If my only choice is between 9mm I’ll pick the heaviest one and throw it at the agressor.

  12. The 25th Infantry Division should be getting the new M17 Pistols at the same time as the 101st, especially the Wolf Hounds & 3/4 Cavalry of the 25th Division. Put these weapons in the hands of the Troops who will inflict the most damage to our enemies in war time. The M17 does not need to be IN THE REAR WITH THE GEAR!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  13. of it aint broke don’t fix it the 100 year old 1911 still out preforms them all
    1st Bn 12th cav 1at cav div airborne former 11th airassault 187 ft bemning Ga

    ( retired 7 / 29 / 1965

    • Ron, thanks for your service to our great nation. Our men in uniform deserve to have the best. My preference is always buy American made. As a proud American, I wish we had a firearm that would receive as much praise as the P320.

    • Robert Hartwig Jr.

      With all due respect for your service and experiance the military has changed. It must accomidate the current crop of young men/woman. Weapons must now fit a wider variance of humans then ever before.Sorry but the fact is the average (underline the word average, there has never been average soldiers in the 1st Air Cav.) soldier has never been able to be accurate with the 1911. Woman soldiers by in large have problems with hand size and the bulk of the 1911 as well as the current M9. I will not go into the agruement that women should not be in combat rolls as it is a fact of current life. I agree that the 1911 in the right hands and properly tuned is a great weapon and the 45 acp very effective.I have a Smith and Wesson 45 that can cut the black center out of a pistol target at 3 yards.The Sig 228 I have has been more accurate then any other gun I own. The next closest to it is my Smith and Wesson MP9. I credit my success in better accuracy to the fact that these guns FIT MY HAND and are Comfotable.THEY shoot better then me. In todays military it has been proven that guns that fit the indevidual soldier work better then trying to force the soldier to fit the weapon.The 1911 will remain as a backup for the forseeable future but it’s days are numbered as warfare evolves for better or worse,

    • OK 1911 guys, you’re absolutely right, mostly.

      It’s been a prolific and substantially shaped nearly all semi auto hand guns since it first debut. Evolution is necessary and the 1911 is not the right choice , period.

      The RFP ruled the traditional 1911 out, but STI and a partner submitted a…hmmm, questionable , very 1911 like pistol. It didn’t go far in selection.

      Look close at the XM17/18 guys, the 1911 and XM17/18 ergonomic similarities are uncanny. Very derivative, just better in line with today’s requirements and production capabilities.

      Add to what I expect to happen sooner than later, a series of small arms caliber changes in the next say, 10 years or so; the modular nature of the chosen platform does allow for caliber changes with reduced acquisition and fielding costs. So today we have 9mm with NATO compatibility, tomorrow could be the return to main stream service for a modern .45 cal round… just not today.

    • It really doesn’t. Don’t get me wrong, I shot 1911s in the Army, my first auto loading pistol was a 1911, and we own two of them in my household today. They are accurate and ergonomically one of the most comfortable guns to shoot, but they do not out perform more modern pistols in terms of weight, reliability and ammo capacity. The .45ACP is my round of preference, but the 1911 does not have a monopoly on that round. My G21 holds 13+1, is accurate and utterly reliable at less weight than a 1911.

      And don’t start on the lack of an external safety thing. I’ve carried the same G21 in Condition Red since 2001 without a single ND. Accept that the US military is going to go with the 9mm, so let’s make sure that our current crop or war fighters have the best pistol we can provide for them. And, Brother, as much as I love them, the 1911 isn’t ever going to be considered as the mass issue weapon for the troops again for the same reasons that it’s not my EDC.

    • I can’t say that I agree; the 1911 is an AD waiting to happen. The 1911actually under performs most all other pistols. There was a reason why commands didn’t allow watch standers to carry a loaded chamber, or no magazine in the pistol, or worse yet not even issue ammo to watch standers. As a Firearms Instructor for 20yrs. in the Coast Guard and another 20+yrs. in Law Enforcement, I’ve seen more ADs with 1911s than with all other pistols & rifles combined. The 1911 is a great pistol, for what it was design, as a battle field pistol, a true war horse. But,…. Current missions and uses of their pistols have changed for all the services to the point where the 1911 simply doesn’t fit the bill. And please spare us the “it’s the fault of limited training” argument. Training time & money isn’t going to support improvement to the level needed to be really proficient with the 1911.

  14. Until you have done business with the government you have know idea what is necessary. There are not enough aftermarket grip suppliers or inventories to even be considered using.

  15. I’ve shot the p320 full size 9 and I had no issues with it. Although I think there is nothing wrong with today’s lighter composite 1911’s; it’s just that the army wanted a customizable gun ( hand size, caliber, and barrel length) that didn’t break the bank.

  16. The 7 shot 1911 had its day but that day has passed. Hell why not go back to the 1873 colt. SMH. Good on them for picking the sig 320.

  17. Larry S
    the 1911 is one of the greatest handguns , if not the greatest ever made. I don’t know why they ever switched..

  18. Anything would have been an improvement over the Beretta. My question is what was the cost per gun compared to the Glock (which is made in America).

  19. I prefer 1911 .45. Carried one in US Army 1958-1969. I have 3 1911 types, Colt 1911, Commander in .45 and a new RIA 1911 9mm. I shoot them weekly. Fellow shooters recently have “gone Glock” but prefer 1911. However, I do support our services using the excellent SIG 320.

  20. I wonder what difference the Army’s ammunition requirement entails compared to civilian ammunition requirements? Perhaps the necessity to shoot only ball ammunition? The M1911 and the A1 are engineered to fire only ball ammunition reliably. I know some commercial hollowpoints work in them, but I don’t use anything but ball in mine.

  21. NOTHING, is better for CQB than the 1911. Why the change after all the years of success is beyond explanation. I’ve seen a wired perp charge an officer and beat the living sXit out of him after being shot 9 times with a 9mm. It took another officer to stop this POS from killing the officer in distress. You really think it will stop a moslem terrorist charged up on meth , I think not.

  22. Time marches on, and so does weapon technology. The 1911 is a great pistol, and so is the Beretta 92. My wife and I each own both of them, and I carried a Kimber 1911 in Iraq and was the envy of many other contractors. But this is the 21st Century and the Sig is the gun that won the current contract. I think it’s a good gun and will serve our troops well.

    There have been very few instances of guns adopted by the US military being less than effective in modern times. As history verifies, the M14 is one example yet I know there will be many people who will jump in and berate me for saying that even though history verifies it.

    Guns, like cars, are very emotional objects. We will love or hate a certain brand or type based entirely on our own internal drives and opinions, regardless of the reality of the situation.

    • According to a couple news outlets Sig won mainly because of price over Glock which was more expensive. Being a modular firearm is a plus.

    • Most interested in the “history” of the M14 being less than effective. “After the competing M16 rifle was introduced in 1970, the M14 took on a new role with the U.S. military as a sniper rifle. The M14 rifle’s accuracy over long ranges made it an ideal weapon for marksmen.” Sure shooters can’t “spray and pray” and waste ammo like you can with a -16/-4 but as the quote said, “an ideal weapon for marksmen.” Modified versions of the M14 rifle have been used by snipers in Afghanistan and Iraq. I was issued a -14 upon entry in the Army and loved it, got “loaned” out to NATO Forces for a few years, weapon? M-14. Didn’t get my first Matty Mattel until 1975 and thought that it was a(bad) joke then and still do, nice rifle for ladies I’ve noticed.

      • Never handled or fired an M-14. I’ve heard that it wasn’t particularly well suited to the jungles in VN. I love my M-14 civilian knock-off, the M1a, very accurate, well made. The M-16 was pretty bad but has morphed into an excellent M-4. I like my 1911 knock-off too, carry it cocked and locked but my S&W M&P 2.0 9MM is a sidearm that I shoot MUCH better. My colt LE-1960, AR-15 is a very accurate, extremely effective weapon. Both Daughters do, in fact, shoot it very effectively!

        • William – The M-14 was heavier (+/-) 10 pounds compared to the 6 or 7 for the M-4/M-16 and the rounds were larger and heavier too. Add the wooden stock to that and, yeah, not the best thing to carry in the jungle..or desert..or “over hill, over dale”. But when punchin’ paper at 25 meters, something that can have 9 holes touching while using iron sights isn’t to be discounted. You might be amused to read (or re-read) the humorous article – although I don’t think that it was intended to be – by Gersh Kuntzman (that’s his real name?) of the New York Daily News about his experience firing the AR-15, spoiler alert, it bruised his shoulder and gave him PTSD…he said.

  23. Where does the stupidity end?,a 22 cal that can’t shoot thru trees an enemy is hiding behind?, trashing the M14 a thousand yrd rifle,a New pistol still puny 9mm but hey you can get New gtips and night sights like I have on my 45 ACP,and what about body amour DRAGON SKIN,YOUR POLITICS ruined a fine co. But of course no independent study,for the truth, IT IS HORRIFYING WATCHING STUPIDITY IN ACTIONA

  24. The M16/M4/AR-15 in most of its variants is a great varmint rifle, and can’t be beat for plinking on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon. But my M14/M1A is still the weapon of choice for reliability and for its ability to “reach out and touch someone” which are usually white tail or mule deer now. Likewise I love the 1911 and never had an ND. I’m also “sold” on the Glocks, at least the ones that are large enough to fit my hand. These are my personal carry weapons. I have not yet tried the Sig P320 but am looking forward to testing it for myself. Yes, I know everyone has an opinion, so don’t “knock” me for mine!

  25. I carried a 1911 on the job in Colorado for several years. Back then you had to purchase your own firearm and be able to qualify with it in order to carry it on the job. Except for some odd looks from people I never had a AD. I Also shot IPSIC competition with a modified 1911 since it is considered a major caliber in the event. That being said I have a Sig P320 compact 9mm that I bought when they first came out. I have shot close to 10,000 rounds through my P320 so far. Never a FTF or FTE. That and my H&K are my favorite pistols.

  26. Ad question is Stupid if you are trained Properly—Also Guys take your head out of the Sand.
    The Sid P320 is the same operation as a 1911 –The only difference it has an internal striker –Cock and locked –Condition 1–except thre Hammer /firing pin is concealed in Slide–So if you are going to have a –AD –it the USER Fault –The Gun does not have a Brain –it a mechanical Device,

  27. What is the difference between a 2025 and the 320 ? I just recently came in possession of the 2025 , and it actually carries great , shoots even better , but my edc is a Kimber cop ultra , shame they can’t go wit Kimber , very accurate

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